90 The Fault In Our Stars Quotes With Page Numbers

These The Fault In Our Stars Quotes With Page Numbers help you reference your favorite quotes.

The Fault In Our Stars, by John Green, is about a 16-year-old girl named Hazel with terminal cancer. An experimental drug that shrank her tumors has bought Hazel a few years. 

Depressed Hazel reluctantly goes to a Cancer Kid Support Group where she meets Agustus Waters. Agustus also had cancer but he appears to be cancer-free. Agustus loves Hazel, but Hazel is hesitant with her future uncertain. Will they get together before it’s too late?

<img class=”aligncenter wp-image-12405″ src=”https://agelessinvesting.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/The-Fault-In-Our-Stars-200×300.jpg” alt=”A black cloud over a white cloud against a blue background, with the headline: "The Fault In Our Stars Quotes With Page Numbers"The Fault In Our Stars Quotes With Page Numbers” width=”465″ height=”698″ data-pin-title=”90 The Fault In Our Stars Quotes With Page Numbers” data-pin-description=”These The Fault In Our Stars Quotes With Page Numbers help you reference your favorite quotes.

The Fault In Our Stars, by John Green, is about a 16-year-old girl named Hazel with terminal cancer. An experimental drug that shrank her tumors has bought Hazel a few years. ” data-pin-id=”834221530995066236″>

The Fault In Our Stars Quotes With Page Numbers

“As the tide washed in, the Dutch Tulip Man faced the Ocean:
“Conjoiner rejoinder poisoner concealer revelator. Look at it, rising up and rising down, taking everything with it.”

“What’s that?” Anna asked.

“Water,” the Dutchman said. “Well, and time.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 0

 

“Whenever you read a cancer booklet or website or whatever, they always list depression among the side effects of cancer. But, in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. Depression is a side effect of dying.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 3

 

“There was quite a lot of competitiveness about it, with everybody wanting to beat not only cancer itself, but also the other people in the room. Like, I realize that this is irrational, but when they tell you that you have, say, a 20 percent chance of living five years, the math kicks in and you figure that’s one in five . . . so you look around and think, as any healthy person would: I gotta outlast four of these bastards.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 5

 

“Look, let me just say it: He was hot. A nonhot boy stares at you relentlessly and it is, at best, awkward and, at worst, a form of assault. But a hot boy . . . well.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 9

 

“There were five others before they got to him. He smiled a little when his turn came. His voice was low, smoky, and dead sexy. “My name is Augustus Waters,” he said. “I’m seventeen. I had a little touch of osteosarcoma a year and a half ago, but I’m just here today at Isaac’s request.”

“And how are you feeling?” asked Patrick.

“Oh, I’m grand.” Augustus Waters smiled with a corner of his mouth. “I’m on a roller coaster that only goes up, my friend.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 11

 

“Augustus, perhaps you’d like to share your fears with the group.”
“My fears?”
“Yes.”
“I fear oblivion,” he said without a moment’s pause. “I fear it like the proverbial blind man who’s afraid of the dark.”
“Too soon,” Isaac said, cracking a smile.
“Was that insensitive?” Augustus asked. “I can be pretty blind to other people’s feelings.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Pages 11-12

 

“There will come a time when all of us are dead. All of us. There will come a time when there are no human beings remaining to remember that anyone ever existed or that our species ever did anything. There will be no one left to remember Aristotle or Cleopatra, let alone you. Everything that we did and built and wrote and thought and discovered will be forgotten and all of this will have been for naught. Maybe that time is coming soon and maybe it is millions of years away, but even if we survive the collapse of our sun, we will not survive forever. There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it. God knows that’s what everyone else does.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Pages 12, 13

 

“There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 13

 

“Thank you for explaining that my eye cancer isn’t going to make me deaf. I feel so fortunate that an intellectual giant like yourself would deign to operate on me.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 15

 

“We are literally in the heart of Jesus,” he said. “I thought we were in a church basement, but we are literally in the heart of Jesus.”
“Someone should tell Jesus,” I said. “I mean, it’s gotta be dangerous, storing children with cancer in your heart.”
“I would tell Him myself,” Augustus said, “but unfortunately I am literally stuck inside of His heart, so He won’t be able to hear me.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 16

 

“Because you are beautiful. I enjoy looking at beautiful people, and I decided a while ago not to deny myself the simpler pleasures of existence”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 16

 

“It’s a metaphor, see: You put the killing thing right between your teeth, but you don’t give it the power to do its killing.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 20

 

“I told Augustus the broad outline of my miracle: diagnosed with Stage IV thyroid cancer when I was thirteen. (I didn’t tell him that the diagnosis came three months after I got my first period. Like: Congratulations! You’re a woman. Now die.)”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 24

 

“And I wondered if hurdlers ever thought, you know, ‘This would go faster if we just got rid of the hurdles.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 31

 

“Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, (Character: Hazel Grace), Page 33

 

“Books so special and rare and yours that advertising your affection feels like a betrayal.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 33

 

“Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book. And then there are books like An Imperial Affliction, which you can’t tell people about, books so special and rare and yours that advertising your affection feels like betrayal”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 33

 

“Without pain, how could we know joy?’ This is an old argument in the field of thinking about suffering and its stupidity and lack of sophistication could be plumbed for centuries but suffice it to say that the existence of broccoli does not, in any way, affect the taste of chocolate.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 35

 

“May I see you again?” he asked. There was an endearing nervousness in his voice.

I smiled. “Sure.”

“Tomorrow?” he asked.

“Patience, grasshopper,” I counseled. “You don’t want to seem overeager.

“Right, that’s why I said tomorrow,” he said. “I want to see you again tonight. But I’m willing to wait all night and much of tomorrow.” I rolled my eyes. “I’m serious,” he said.

“You don’t even know me,” I said. I grabbed the book from the center console. “How about I call you when I finish this?”

“But you don’t even have my phone number,” he said.

“I strongly suspect you wrote it in this book.”

He broke out into that goofy smile. “And you say we don’t know each other.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Pages 36, 37

 

“Tell me my copy is missing the last twenty pages or something.

Hazel Grace, tell me I have not reached the end of this book.

OH MY GOD DO THEY GET MARRIED OR NOT OH MY GOD WHAT IS THIS?!”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 53

 

“All salvation is temporary,” Augustus shot back. “I bought them a minute. Maybe that’s the minute that buys them an hour, which is the hour that buys them a year. No one’s gonna buy them forever, Hazel Grace, but my life bought them a minute. And that’s not nothing.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 59

 

“Sometimes people don’t understand the promises they’re making when they make them.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 60

 

“That’s the thing about pain. It demands to be felt”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 63

 

“That’s part of what I like about the book in some ways. It portrays death truthfully. You die in the middle of your life, in the middle of a sentence”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 67

 

“And then the line was quiet but not dead. I almost felt like he was there in my room with me, but in a way it was better, like I was not in my room and he was not in his, but instead we were together in some invisible and tenuous third space that could only be visited on the phone.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 72

 

“Maybe ‘okay’ will be our ‘always”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 73

 

“Come over here so I can examine your face with my hands and see deeper into your soul than a sighted person ever could.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 74

 

“But I believe in true love, you know? I don’t believe that everybody gets to keep their eyes or not get sick or whatever, but everybody should have true love, and it should last at least as long as your life does.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 75

 

“Augustus,” I said. “Really. You don’t have to do this.”
“Sure I do,” he said. “I found my Wish.”
“God, you’re the best,” I told him.
“I bet you say that to all the boys who finance your international travel,” he answered.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 90

 

“I’m a grenade and at some point I’m going to blow up and I would like to minimize the casualties, okay?”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 99

 

“He responded a few minutes later.

Okay.

I wrote back.

Okay.

He responded:

Oh, my God, stop flirting with me!”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 102

 

“But it is the nature of stars to cross, and never was Shakespeare more wrong than when he has Cassius note, ‘The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars / But in ourselves.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 111

 

“there is no shortage of fault to be found amid our stars”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 111-12

 

“You do not immortalize the lost by writing about them. Language buries, but does not resurrect.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 112

 

“What a slut time is. She screws everybody.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 112

 

“Headline?” he asked.
“‘Swing Set Needs Home,'” I said.
“‘Desperately Lonely Swing Set Needs Loving Home,'” he said.
“‘Lonely, Vaguely Pedophilic Swing Set Seeks the Butts of Children,'” I said.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 123

 

“That’s why I like you. Do you realize how rare it is to come across a hot girl who creates a adjectival version of the word pedophile? You are so busy being you that you have no idea how utterly unprecedented you are.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 123

 

“As he read, I fell in love the way you fall asleep: slowly, and then all at once.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Pages 124-25

 

“I’ve gotten really hot since you went blind.”

~john green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 130

 

“The weird thing about houses is that they almost always look like nothing is happening inside of them, even though they contain most of our lives. I wondered if that was sort of the point of architecture.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 139

 

“You’re arguing that the fragile, rare thing is beautiful simply because it is fragile and rare. But that’s a lie, and you know it.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 145

 

“I’m in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we’re all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we’ll ever have, and I am in love with you.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 153

 

“I’m in love with you,” he said quietly.

“Augustus,” I said.

“I am,” he said. He was staring at me, and I could see the corners of his eyes crinkling. “I’m in love with you, and I’m not in the business of denying myself the simple pleasure of saying true things. I’m in love with you, and I know that love is just a shout into the void, and that oblivion is inevitable, and that we’re all doomed and that there will come a day when all our labor has been returned to dust, and I know the sun will swallow the only earth we’ll ever have, and I am in love with you.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 155

 

“Some tourists think Amsterdam is a city of sin, but in truth it is a city of freedom. And in freedom, most people find sin.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 157

 

“If you don’t live a life in service of a greater good, you’ve gotta at least die a death in service of a greater good, you know? And I fear that I won’t get either a life or a death that means anything.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 168

 

“I wanted to know that he would be okay if I died. I wanted to not be a grenade, to not be a malevolent force in the lives of people I loved.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 172

 

“Oh, I wouldn’t mind, Hazel Grace. It would be a privilege to have my heart broken by you.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 176

 

“The world is not a wish-granting factory.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 182

 

“Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 189

 

“Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 189, 213, and 260

 

“Our fearlessness shall be our secret weapon.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 202

 

“Augustus Waters,” I said, looking up at him, thinking that you cannot kiss anyone in the Anne Frank House, and then thinking that Anne Frank, after all, kissed someone in the Anne Frank House, and that she would probably like nothing more than for her home to have become a place where the young and irreparably broken sink into love.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 202

 

“You have a choice in this world, I believe, about how to tell sad stories, and we made the funny choice.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 209

 

“Much of my life had been devoted to trying not to cry in front of people who loved me, so I knew what Augustus was doing. You clench your teeth. You look up. You tell yourself that if they see you cry, it will hurt them, and you will be nothing but a Sadness in their lives, and you must not become a mere sadness, so you will not cry, and you say all of this to yourself while looking up at the ceiling, and then you swallow even though your throat does not want to close and you look at the person who loves you and smile.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Pages 213-14

 

“Only now that I loved a grenade did I understand the foolishness of trying to save others from my own impending fragmentation: I couldn’t unlove Augustus Waters. And I didn’t want to.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 214

 

“I’ll fight it. I’ll fight it for you. Don’t you worry about me, Hazel Grace. I’m okay. I’ll find a way to hang around and annoy you for a long time.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 215

 

“Because there is no glory in illness. There is no meaning to it. There is no honor in dying of.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 217

 

“I’m on a roller coaster that only goes up, my friend.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 218

 

“I believe the universe wants to be noticed. I think the universe is inprobably biased toward the consciousness, that it rewards intelligence in part because the universe enjoys its elegance being observed. And who am I, living in the middle of history, to tell the universe that it-or my observation of it-is temporary?”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 223

 

“How are the eyes?’
‘Oh, excellent,’ he said. ‘I mean, they’re not in my head is the only problem.’
‘Awesome, yeah,’ Gus said. ‘Not to one-up you or anything, but my body is made out of cancer.’
‘So I heard,’ Issac said, trying not to let it get to him. He fumbled toward Gus’s hand and found only his thigh.
‘I’m taken,’ Gus said.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 225

 

“Ma’am,” Augustus said, nodding toward her, “Your daughter’s car has just been deservingly egged by a blind man. Please close the door and go back inside or we’ll be forced to call the police.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 229

 

“Gus: “It tastes like…”
Me: “Food.”
Gus: “Yes, precisely. It tastes like food, excellently prepared. But it does not taste, how do I put this delicately…?”
Me: “It does not taste like God Himself cooked heaven into a series of five dishes which were then served to you accompanied by several luminous balls of fermented, bubbly plasma while actual and literal flower petals floated down around your canal-side dinner table.”
Gus: “Nicely phrased.”
Gus’s father: “Our children are weird.”
My dad: “Nicely phrased.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 231

 

“It seemed like forever ago, like we’ve had this brief but still infinite forever. Some infinities are bigger than other infinities.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 233

 

“The risen sun too bright in her losing eyes.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 238

 

“You say you’re not special because the world doesn’t know about you, but that’s an insult to me. I know about you.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 240

 

“According to the conventions of the genre, Augustus Waters kept his sense of humor till the end, did not for a moment waiver in his courage, and his spirit soared like an indomitable eagle until the world itself could not contain his joyous soul.

But this is the truth, a pitiful boy who desperately wanted not to be pitiful, screaming and crying, poisoned by an infected G-tube that kept him alive, but not alive enough.

I wiped his chin and grabbed his face in my hands and knelt down close to him so that I could see his eyes, which still lived. ‘I’m sorry. I wish it was like that movie, with the Persians and the Spartans.’

‘Me too,’ he said.

‘But it isn’t,’ I said.

‘I know,’ he said.

‘There are no bad guys.’

‘Yeah.’

‘Even cancer isn’t a bad guy really: Cancer just wants to be alive.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Pages 245-46

 

“What’s that?”
“The laundry basket?”
“No, next to it.”
“I don’t see anything next to it.”
“It’s my last shred of dignity. It’s very small.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 248

 

“It’s just that most really good-looking people are stupid, so I exceed expectations.’
‘Right, it’s primarily his hotness,’ I said.
‘It can be sort of blinding,’ he said.
‘It actually did blind our friend Isaac,’ I said.
‘Terrible tragedy, that. But can I help my own deadly beauty?’
‘You cannot.’
‘It is my burden, this beautiful face.’
‘Not to mention your body.’
‘Seriously, don’t even get me started on my hot bod. You don’t want to see me naked, Dave. Seeing me naked actually took Hazel Grace’s breath away,’ he said, nodding toward the oxygen tank.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 251

 

“Augustus Waters was a self-aggrandizing bastard. But we forgive him. We forgive him not because he had a heart as figuratively good as his literal one sucked, or because he knew more about how to hold a cigarette than any nonsmoker in history, or because he got eighteen years when he should’ve gotten more.’
‘Seventeen,’ Gus corrected.
‘I’m assuming you’ve got some time, you interupting bastard.
‘I’m telling you,’ Isaac continued, ‘Augustus Waters talked so much that he’d interupt you at his own funeral. And he was pretentious: Sweet Jesus Christ, that kid never took a piss without pondering the abundant metaphorical resonances of human waste production. And he was vain: I do not believe I have ever met a more physically attractive person who was more acutely aware of his own physical attractiveness.
‘But I will say this: When the scientists of the future show up at my house with robot eyes and they tell me to try them on, I will tell the scientists to screw off, because I do not want to see a world without him.’
I was kind of crying by then.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 258

 

“But I will say this: When the scientists of the future show up at my house with robot eyes and they tell me to try them on, I will tell the scientists to screw off, because I do not want to see a world without him.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 258

 

“My name is Hazel. Augustus Waters was the great sat-crossed love of my life. Ours was an epic love story, and I won’t be able to get more than a sentence into it without disappearing into a puddle of tears. Gus knew. Gus knows. I will not tell you our love story, because-like all real love stories-it will die with us, as it should. I’d hoped that he’d be eulogizing me, because there’s no one I’d rather have…” I started crying. “Okay, how not to cry. How am I-okay. Okay.”

I took a few deep breaths and went back to the page. “I can’t talk about our love story, so I will talk about math. I am not a mathematician, but I know this: There are infinite numbers between 0 and 1. There’s .1 and .12 and .112 and infinite collection of others. Of course, there is a Bigger infinite set of numbers between 0 and 2, or between 0 and a million. Some infinities are bigger than other infinities. A writer we used to like taught us that. There are days, many of them, when I resent the size of my unbounded set. I want more numbers than I’m likely to get, and God, I want more numbers for Augustus Waters than he got. But, Gus, my love, I cannot tell you how thankful I am for our little infinity. I wouldn’t trade it for the world. You gave me a forever within the numbered days, and I’m grateful.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 259-60

 

“There are infinite numbers between 0 and 1. There’s .1 and .12 and .112 and an infinite collection of others. Of course, there is a bigger infinite set of numbers between 0 and 2, or between 0 and a million. Some infinities are bigger than other infinities. A writer we used to like taught us that. There are days, many of them, when I resent the size of my unbounded set. I want more numbers than I’m likely to get, and God, I want more numbers for Augustus Waters than he got. But, Gus, my love, I cannot tell you how thankful I am for our little infinity. I wouldn’t trade it for the world. You gave me a forever within the numbered days, and I’m grateful.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 260

 

“You gave me a forever within the numbered days, and I’m grateful.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 260

 

“The pleasure of remembering had been taken from me, because there was no longer anyone to remember with. It felt like losing your co-rememberer meant losing the memory itself, as if the things we’d done were less real and important than they had been hours before.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 262

 

“The only person I really wanted to talk to about Augustus Water’s death with was Augustus Waters.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 262

 

“When you go into the ER, one of the first things they ask you to do is rate your pain on a scale of one to ten, and from there they decide which drugs to use and how quickly to use them. I’d been asked this question hundreds of times over the years, and I remember once early on when I couldn’t get my breath and it felt like my chest was on fire, flames licking the inside of my ribs fighting for a way to burn out of my body, my parents took me to the ER. nurse asked me about the pain, and I couldn’t even speak, so I held up nine fingers.

Later, after they’d given me something, the nurse came in and she was kind of stroking my head while she took my blood pressure and said, “You know how I know you’re a fighter? You called a ten a nine.”

But that wasn’t quite right. I called it a nine because I was saving my ten. And here it was, the great and terrible ten, slamming me again and again as I lay still and alone in my bed staring at the ceiling, the waves tossing me against the rocks then pulling me back out to sea so they could launch me again into the jagged face of the cliff, leaving me floating faceup on the water, undrowned.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Pages 262-63

 

“I love you present tense.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 270

 

“I was blind and heart broken and didn’t want to do anything and Gus burst into my room and shouted, “I have wonderful news!” And I was like, “I don’t really want to hear wonderful news right now,” and Gus said, “This is wonderful news you want to hear,” and I asked him, “Fine, what is it?” and he said, “You are going to live a good and long life filled with great and terrible moments that you cannot even imagine yet!”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 272

 

“Issac:”I dislike living in a world without Augustus Waters.”
Computer: “I don’t understand-”
Issac: “Me neither. Pause”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 281

 

“Pain is like fabric: The stronger it is, the more it’s worth.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 285

 

“Grief does not change you, Hazel. It reveals you.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 286

 

“I missed the future. Obviously I knew even before his recurrence that I’d never grow old with Augustus Waters. But thinking about Lidewij and her boyfriend, I felt robbed. I would probably never again see the ocean from thirty thousand feet above, so far up that you can’t make out the waves or any boats, so that the ocean is a great and endless monolith. I could imagine it. I could remember it. But I couldn’t see it again, and it occurred to me that the voracious ambition of humans is never sated by dreams coming true, because there is always the thought that everything might be done better and again.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 305

 

“Van Houten,
I’m a good person but a shitty writer. You’re a shitty person but a good writer. We’d make a good team. I don’t want to ask you any favors, but if you have time – and from what I saw, you have plenty – I was wondering if you could write a eulogy for Hazel. I’ve got notes and everything, but if you could just make it into a coherent whole or whatever? Or even just tell me what I should say differently.
Here’s the thing about Hazel: Almost everyone is obsessed with leaving a mark upon the world. Bequeathing a legacy. Outlasting death. We all want to be remembered. I do, too. That’s what bothers me most, is being another unremembered casualty in the ancient and inglorious war against disease.
I want to leave a mark.
But Van Houten: The marks humans leave are too often scars. You build a hideous minimall or start a coup or try to become a rock star and you think, “They’ll remember me now,” but (a) they don’t remember you, and (b) all you leave behind are more scars. Your coup becomes a dictatorship. Your minimall becomes a lesion.
(Okay, maybe I’m not such a shitty writer. But I can’t pull my ideas together, Van Houten. My thoughts are stars I can’t fathom into constellations.)
We are like a bunch of dogs squirting on fire hydrants. We poison the groundwater with our toxic piss, marking everything MINE in a ridiculous attempt to survive our deaths. I can’t stop pissing on fire hydrants. I know it’s silly and useless – epically useless in my current state – but I am an animal like any other.
Hazel is different. She walks lightly, old man. She walks lightly upon the earth. Hazel knows the truth: We’re as likely to hurt the universe as we are to help it, and we’re not likely to do either.
People will say it’s sad that she leaves a lesser scar, that fewer remember her, that she was loved deeply but not widely. But it’s not sad, Van Houten. It’s triumphant. It’s heroic. Isn’t that the real heroism? Like the doctors say: First, do no harm.
The real heroes anyway aren’t the people doing things; the real heroes are the people NOTICING things, paying attention. The guy who invented the smallpox vaccine didn’t actually invented anything. He just noticed that people with cowpox didn’t get smallpox.
After my PET scan lit up, I snuck into the ICU and saw her while she was unconscious. I just walked in behind a nurse with a badge and I got to sit next to her for like ten minutes before I got caught. I really thought she was going to die, too. It was brutal: the incessant mechanized haranguing of intensive care. She had this dark cancer water dripping out of her chest. Eyes closed. Intubated. But her hand was still her hand, still warm and the nails painted this almost black dark blue and I just held her hand and tried to imagine the world without us and for about one second I was a good enough person to hope she died so she would never know that I was going, too. But then I wanted more time so we could fall in love. I got my wish, I suppose. I left my scar.
A nurse guy came in and told me I had to leave, that visitors weren’t allowed, and I asked if she was doing okay, and the guy said, “She’s still taking on water.” A desert blessing, an ocean curse.
What else? She is so beautiful. You don’t get tired of looking at her. You never worry if she is smarter than you: You know she is. She is funny without ever being mean. I love her. I am so lucky to love her, Van Houten. You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world, old man, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 310-13

 

“The marks humans leave are too often scars.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 311

 

“She had this dark cancer water dripping out of her chest. Eyes closed. Intubated. But her hand was still her hand, still warm and the nails painted this almost black dark blue and I just held her hand and tried to imagine the world without us and for about one second I was a good enough person to hope she died so she would never know that I was going, too. But then I wanted more time so we could fall in love. I got my wish, I suppose. I left my scar.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 312

 

“We’re as likely to hurt the universe as we are to help it, and we’re not likely to do either.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 312

 

“The real heroes anyway aren’t the people doing things; the real heroes are the people NOTICING things, paying attention.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 312

 

“People will say it’s sad that she leaves a lesser scar, that fewer remember her, that she was loved deeply but not widely. But it’s not sad, Van Houten. It’s triumphant. It’s heroic. Isn’t that the real heroism? Like the doctors say: First, do no harm.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 312

 

“What else? She is so beautiful. You don’t get tired of looking at her. You never worry if she is smarter than you: You know she is. She is funny without ever being mean. I love her. I am so lucky to love her, Van Houten. You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world, old man, but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices. I hope she likes hers.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 313

 

“You don’t get to choose if you get hurt in this world…but you do have some say in who hurts you. I like my choices.”

~John Green, The Fault in Our Stars, Page 313

 

Further Reading:

The Book Thief Quotes With Page Numbers

The Alchemist Quotes With Page Numbers

The Kite Runner Quotes With Page Numbers

The Best Book Quotes With Page Numbers

Leave a Reply

Scroll to Top
%d bloggers like this: