50 Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers

Try these Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers to help you find your favorite quotes.

Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë, is about Jane, a plain and simple woman who struggles against oppression. Jane must overcome her cruel aunt Reed, the harsh conditions at Lowood school, and losing her love, Rochester, to Bertha. Jane also fights against class hierarchy and the patriarchal domination of women.

Will Jane and Rochester get together?

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Jane Eyre quotes by chapter and page numbers.

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 1

“Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Preface, Page 1

 

“Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last. To pluck the mask from the face of the Pharisee, is not to lift an impious hand to the Crown of Thorns.

These things and deeds are diametrically opposed: they are as distinct as is vice from virtue. Men too often confound them: they should not be confounded: appearance should not be mistaken for truth; narrow human doctrines, that only tend to elate and magnify a few, should not be substituted for the world-redeeming creed of Christ. There is – I repeat it – a difference; and it is a good, and not a bad action to mark broadly and clearly the line of separation between them.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Preface, Page 1

Quotes From Jane Eyre With Page Numbers Chapter 4

“No sight so sad as that of a naughty child,” he began, “especially a naughty little girl. Do you know where the wicked go after death?”

“They go to hell,” was my ready and orthodox answer.

“And what is hell? Can you tell me that?”

“A pit full of fire.”

“And should you like to fall into that pit, and to be burning there for ever?”

“No, sir.”

“What must you do to avoid it?”

I deliberated a moment: my answer, when it did come was objectionable: “I must keep in good health and not die.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 4, Pages 35, 36

 

“I am not deceitful: if I were, I should say I loved you; but I declare I do not love you: I dislike you the worst of anybody in the world.”

~Charlotte Brontë , Jane Eyre, Chapter 4, Pages 40, 41

 

“Even for me life had its gleams of sunshine.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 4, Page 46

Jane Eyre Quotes And Page Numbers Chapter 6

“It is far better to endure patiently a smart which nobody feels but yourself,
than to commit a hasty action whose evil consequences will extend to all
connected with you.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 6, Page 67

 

“Yet it would be your duty to bear it, if you could not avoid it: it is weak and silly to say you cannot bear what it is your fate to be required to bear.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 6, Page 67

 

“It is not violence that best overcomes hate — nor vengeance that most certainly heals injury.”

~Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre, Chapter 6, Page 70

 

“Life appears to me too short to be spent in nursing animosity or registering wrongs.”

~Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre, Chapter 6, Pages 70, 71

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 8

“If all the world hated you and believed you wicked, while your own conscience approved of you and absolved you from guilt, you would not be without friends.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 8, Page 84

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 10

“I remembered that the real world was wide, and that a varied field of hopes and fears, of sensations and excitments, awaited those who had the courage to go forth into it’s expanse, to seek real knowledge of life amidst it’s perils.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 10, Page 105

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 11

“It is a pity that doing one’s best does not always answer.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 11, Page 119

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 12

“It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquility: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 12, Pages 138, 139

 

“It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. Millions are condemned to a stiller doom than mine, and millions are in silent revolt against their lot. Nobody knows how many rebellions besides political rebellions ferment in the masses of life which people earth. Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, to absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 12, Pages 138, 139

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 14

“I don’t think, sir, you have any right to command me, merely because you are older than I, or because you have seen more of the world than I have; your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 14, Page 171

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 15

“I knew…you would do me good, in some way, at some time;- I saw it in your eyes when I first beheld you: their expression and smile did not- (again he stopped)- did not (he proceeded hastily) strike delight to my very inmost heart so for nothing. ”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 15, Page 194

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 16

“It does good to no woman to be flattered [by a man] who does not intend to marry her; and it is madness in all women to let a secret love kindle within them, which, if unreturned and unknown, must devour the life that feeds it; and, if discovered and responded to, must lead, ignis-fatuus-like, into miry wilds whence there is no extrication.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 16, Page 205

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 17

“I had not intended to love him; the reader knows I had wrought hard to extirpate from my soul the germs of love there detected; and now, at the first renewed view of him, they spontaneously revived, great and strong! He made me love him without looking at me.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 17, Page 224

 

“I must, then, repeat continually that we are forever sundered – and yet, while I breathe and think, I must love him.’

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 17, Page 225

 

“He is not to them what he is to me,” I thought: “he is not of their kind. I believe he is of mine- I am sure he is- I feel akin to him- I understand the language of his countenance and movements: though rank and wealth sever us widely, I have something in my brain and heart, in my blood and nerves, that assimilates me mentally to him.”

~Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre, , Chapter 17, Page 225

 

“Good-night, my-” He stopped, bit his lip, and abruptly left me.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 17, Page 233

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 18

“I could not unlove him now, merely because I found that he had ceased to notice me.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 18, Page 239

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 19

“I can live alone, if self-respect, and circumstances require me so to do. I need not sell my soul to buy bliss. I have an inward treasure born with me, which can keep me alive if all extraneous delights should be withheld, or offered only at a price I cannot afford to give.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 19, Page 260

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 22

“There is no happiness like that of being loved by your fellow creatures, and feeling that your presence is an addition to their comfort.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 22, Page 8

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 23

“You — you strange — you almost unearthly thing! — I love as my own flesh. You — poor and obscure, and small and plain as you are — I entreat to accept me as a husband.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 23, Page 19

 

“It is a long way to Ireland, Janet, and I am sorry to send my little friend on such weary travels: but if I can’t do better, how is it to be helped? Are you anything akin to me, do you think, Jane?”

I could risk no sort of answer by this time: my heart was still.

“Because, he said, “I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you – especially when you are near me, as now: it is as if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly and inextricably knotted to a similar string situated in the corresponding quarter of your little frame. And if that boisterous channel, and two hundred miles or so of land some broad between us, I am afraid that cord of communion will be snapt; and then I’ve a nervous notion I should take to bleeding inwardly. As for you, – you’d forget me.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 23, Page 60

 

“I sometimes have a queer feeling with regard to you. As if I had a string somewhere under my left ribs, tightly knotted to a similar string in you. And if you were to leave I’m afraid that cord of communion would snap. And I have a notion that I’d take to bleeding inwardly. As for you, you’d forget me.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 23, Page 16

 

“Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! – I have as much soul as you, – and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you!”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 23, Page 17

 

“Do you think I am an automaton? — a machine without feelings? and can bear to have my morsel of bread snatched from my lips, and my drop of living water dashed from my cup? Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong! — I have as much soul as you — and full as much heart! And if God had gifted me with some beauty and much wealth, I should have made it as hard for you to leave me, as it is now for me to leave you. I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh: it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God’s feet, equal — as we are!”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 23, Pages 17,18

 

“Jane, be still; don’t struggle so like a wild, frantic bird, that is rending its own plumage in its desperation.”
“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being, with an independent will; which I now exert to leave you.”

~Charlotte Brontë , Jane Eyre, Chapter 23, Page 18

 

“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 23, page 18

 

“I ask you to pass through life at my side—to be my second self, and best earthly companion.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 23, Page 18

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 24

“I am not an angel,” I asserted; “and I will not be one till I die: I will be myself.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 24, Page 26

 

“I am not an angel,’ I asserted; ‘and I will not be one till I die: I will be myself. Mr. Rochester, you must neither expect nor exact anything celestial of me – for you will not get it, any more than I shall get it of you: which I do not at all anticipate.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 24, Page 26

 

“Her coming was my hope each day,
Her parting was my pain;
The chance that did her steps delay
Was ice in every vein.”

~Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre, Chapter 24, Page 42

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 27

“Every atom of your flesh is as dear to me as my own: in pain and sickness it would still be dear.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 27, Page 81

 

“Jane, my little darling (so I will call you, for so you are), you don’t know what you are talking about; you misjudge me again: it is not because she is mad I hate her. If you were mad, do you think I should hate you?”

“I do indeed, sir.”

“Then you are mistaken, and you know nothing about me, and nothing about the sort of love of which I am capable. Every atom of your flesh is as dear to me as my own: in pain and sickness it would still be dear. Your mind is my treasure, and if it were broken, it would be my treasure still: if you raved, my arms should confine you, and not a strait waistcoat–your grasp, even in fury, would have a charm for me: if you flew at me as wildly as that woman did this morning, I should receive you in an embrace, at least as fond as it would be restrictive. I should not shrink from you with disgust as I did from her: in your quiet moments you should have no watcher and no nurse but me; and I could hang over you with untiring tenderness, though you gave me no smile in return; and never weary of gazing into your eyes, though they had no longer a ray of recognition for me.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 27, Page 81

 

“I have for the first time found what I can truly love–I have found you. You are my sympathy–my better self–my good angel–I am bound to you with a strong attachment. I think you good, gifted, lovely: a fervent, a solemn passion is conceived in my heart; it leans to you, draws you to my centre and spring of life, wrap my existence about you–and, kindling in pure, powerful flame, fuses you and me in one.”

~Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre, Chapter 27, Pages 99, 100

 

“I care for myself. The more solitary, the more friendless, the more unsustained I am, the more I will respect myself.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 27, Page 102

 

“Laws and principles are not for the times when there is no temptation: they are for such moments as this, when body and soul rise in mutiny against their rigour … If at my convenience I might break them, what would be their worth?”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 27, Page 102

 

“The soul, fortunately, has an interpreter – often an unconscious but still a faithful interpreter – in the eye.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 27, Page 103

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 28

“We know that God is everywhere; but certainly we feel His presence most when His works are on the grandest scale spread before us; and it is in the unclouded night-sky, where His worlds wheel their silent course, that we read clearest His infinitude, His omnipotence, His omnipresence.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 28, Page 112

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 29

“Prejudices, it is well known, are most difficult to eradicate from the heart whose soil has never been loosened or fertilised by education: they grow there, firm as weeds among stones.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 29, Page 133

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 34

“I would always rather be happy than dignified.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 34, Page 226

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 37

“I have little left in myself — I must have you. The world may laugh — may call me absurd, selfish — but it does not signify. My very soul demands you: it will be satisfied, or it will take deadly vengeance on its frame.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 37, Page 261

 

“Am I hideous, Jane?
Very, sir: you always were, you know.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 37, Page 265

 

“All my heart is yours, sir: it belongs to you; and with you it would remain, were fate to exile the rest of me from your presence forever.”

~Charlotte Bronte, Jane Eyre, Chapter 37, Page 272

Jane Eyre Quotes With Page Numbers Chapter 38

“Reader, I married him.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 38, Page 279

 

“I know what it is to live entirely for and with what I love best on earth. I hold myself supremely blest — blest beyond what language can express; because I am my husband’s life as fully as he is mine.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 38, Page 281

 

“I have now been married ten years. I know what it is to live entirely for and with what I love best on earth. I hold myself supremely blest – blest beyond what language can express; because I am my husband’s life as fully as he is mine. No woman was ever nearer to her mate than I am: ever more absolutely bone of his bone and flesh of his flesh. I know no weariness of my Edward’s society: he knows none of mine, any more than we each do the pulsation of the heart that beats in our separate bosoms; consequently, we are ever together. To be together is for us to be at once free as in solitude, as gay as in company. We talk, I believe, all day long: to talk to each other is but more animated and an audible thinking. All my confidence is bestowed on him, all his confidence is devoted to me; we are precisely suited in character – perfect concord is the result.”

~Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 38, Page 281

Jane Eyre Summary

Jane Eyre is a classic novel by Charlotte Brontë, published in 1847. It tells the story of Jane, an orphaned young woman who overcomes many hardships to find true love. Jane is sent to an oppressive boarding school where she meets many people, including the cruel Mrs. Reed and the kind Helen Burns. Despite her harsh treatment, Jane still shows compassion to those around her. After fleeing the school, Jane finds a job as a governess at Thornfield Hall and falls in love with its mysterious owner, Edward Rochester. However, their relationship is complicated by secrets and lies. Jane eventually finds out the truth, and after some hard lessons, she has a happy ending with the man she loves.

 

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