50 Anne Frank Quotes With Page Numbers

These Anne Frank quotes with page numbers help you reference your favorite quotes.

The Diary of A Young Girl is the diary of Anne Frank during the German occupation of Amsterdam. In the time of her diary, Anne Frank was a Jewish girl between the ages of 13 and 14. Anne and her family hid in a secret annex for two years before being betrayed to the Nazis.

Anne’s writings start with daily observations and eventually turn into deeper contemplations of humanity. Near the end, Anne Frank wrote,   “In spite of everything, I still believe that people are really good at heart.”

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Anne Frank Quotes With Page Numbers

What page is this quote on from The Diary of A Young Girl? I’ve also included the date of the entry of the quote.

“Writing in a diary is a really strange experience for someone like me. Not only because I’ve never written anything before, but also because it seems to me that later on neither I nor anyone else will be interested in the musings of a thirteen-year old schoolgirl. Oh well, it doesn’t matter. I feel like writing, and I have an even greater need to get all kinds of things off my chest.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, June 20, 1942, Page 8

 

“It must be awful to feel you’re not needed.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Sunday, July 5, 1942, Page 21

 

“In the future I’m going to devote less time to sentimentality and more time to reality.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Friday, August 14, 1942, Page 35

 

“I think it’s odd that grown-ups quarrel so easily and so often and about such petty matters. Up to now I always thought bickering was just something children did and that they outgrew it.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Monday, September 28, 1942, Page 48

 

“I’ve learned one thing: you only really get to know a person after a fight. Only then can you judge their true character!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Monday, September 28, 1942, Page 51

 

“This week I’ve been reading a lot and doing little work. That’s the way things ought to be. That’s surely the road to success.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, November 5, 1942, Page 67

 

“Leave me alone, let me have at least one night when I don’t cry myself to sleep with my eyes burning and my head pounding. Let me get away, away from everything, away from this world!” But I can’t do that. I can’t let them see my doubts, or the wounds they’ve inflicted on me. I couldn’t bear their sympathy or their good-humored derision. It would only make me want to scream even more.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, January 30, 1943, Page 89

 

“Everyone thinks I’m showing off when I talk, ridiculous when I’m silent, insolent when I answer, cunning when I have a good idea, lazy when I’m tired, selfish when I eat one bite more than I should.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, January 30, 1943, Page 89

 

“I do my best to please everybody, far more than they’d ever guess. I try to laugh it all off, because I don’t want to let them see my trouble.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, January 30, 1943, Page 89

 

“Ordinary people don’t know how much books can mean to someone who’s cooped up. Our only diversions are reading, studying and listening to the radio.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Sunday, july 11, 1943, Pages 116, 117

 

“I’m currently in the middle of a depression. I couldn’t really tell you what set it off, but I think it stems from my cowardice, which confronts me at every turn.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Monday Evening, November 8, 1943, Page 156

 

“But feelings can’t be ignored, no matter how unjust or ungrateful they seem.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Friday, December 24, 1943, Page 166

 

“Paper is more patient than man.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Friday, December 24, 1943, Page 166

 

“Crying can bring relief, as long as you don’t cry alone.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Friday, December 24, 1943, Page 167

 

“You can be lonely even when you are loved by many people, since you are still not anybody’s one and only.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Wednesday, December 29, 1943, Page 169

 

“I love you, with a love so great that it simply couldn’t keep growing inside my heart, but had to leap out and reveal itself in all its magnitude.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Friday, January 7, 1944, Page 179

 

“I’ve reached the point where I hardly care whether I live or die. The world will keep on turning without me, I can’t do anything to change events anyway.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Thursday, February 3, 1944, Page 198

 

“As long as this exists…this sunshine and this cloudless sky, and as long as I can enjoy it, how can I be sad?”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Wednesday, February 23, 1944, Page 212

 

“The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature and God.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Wednesday, February 23, 1944, Page 213

 

“The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quite alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature. As longs as this exists, and it certainly always will, I know that then there will always be comfort for every sorrow, whatever the circumstances may be. And I firmly believe that nature brings solace in all troubles.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Wednesday, February 23, 1944, Page 213

 

“Riches, prestige, everything can be lost. But the happiness in your own heart can only be dimmed; it will always be there, as long as you live, to make you happy again.

Whenever you’re feeling lonely or sad, try going to the loft on a beautiful day and looking outside. Not at the houses and the rooftops, but at the sky. As long as you can look fearlessly at the sky, you’ll know that you’re pure within and will find happiness once more.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Wednesday, February 23, 1944, Pages 213, 214

 

“I’m sentimental–I know. I’m desperate and silly–I know that too. Oh, help me!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Monday, February 28, 1944, Page 215

 

“People can tell you to shut up, but they can’t keep you from having an opinion. You can’t forbid someone to have an opinion…”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Thursday, March 2, 1944, Page 218

 

“Love, what is love? I don’t think you can really put it into words. Love is understanding someone, caring for him, sharing his joys and sorrows. This eventually includes physical love. You’ve shared something, given something away and received something in return, whether or not you’re married, whether or not you have a baby. Losing your virtue doesn’t matter, as long as you know that for as long as you live you’ll have someone at your side who understands you, and who doesn’t have to be shared with anyone else!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Thursday, March 2, 1944, Pages 218, 219

 

“Looking back, I realize that this period of my life has irrevocably come to a close; my happy-go-lucky, carefree schooldays are gone forever. I don’t even miss them. I’ve outgrown them. I can no longer just kid around, since my serious side is always there.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, March 7, 1944, Page 226

 

“Go outside, to the country, enjoy the sun and all nature has to offer. Go outside and try to recapture the happiness within yourself; think of all the beauty in yourself and in everything around you and be happy.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, March 7, 1944, Page 228

 

“I don’t think about all the misery, but about the beauty that still remains.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, March 7, 1944, Page 228

 

“A person who’s happy will make others happy…”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, March 7, 1944, Page 228

 

“A person who’s happy will make others happy; a person who has courage and faith will never die in misery!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, March 7, 1944, Page 228

 

“Even though I’m only fourteen, I know what I want, I know who’s right and who’s wrong, I have my own opinions, ideas and principles, and though it may sound odd coming from a teenager, I feel I’m more of a person than a child—I feel I’m completely independent of others…”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of Anne Frank, Friday, March 17, 1944, Page 240

 

“An empty day, though clear and bright,
Is just as dark as any night.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, March 25, 1944, Page 258

 

“I want to go on living even after my death!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Wednesday, April 5, 1944, Page 270

 

“When I write I can shake off all my cares. My sor-row disappears, my spirits are revived! But, and that’s a big question, will I ever be able to write something great, will I ever become a journalist or a writer?

I hope so, oh, I hope so very much, because writing allows me to record everything, all my thoughts, ideals and fantasies.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Wednesday, April 5, 1944, Page 270

 

“The weak shall fall and the strong shall survive and not be defeated!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of Anne Frank, Tuesday, April 11, 1944, Page 283

 

“What’s done can’t be undone, but at least you can keep it from happening again.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Sunday Morning, May 7, 1944, Page 308

 

“Where there’s hope, there’s life. It fills us with fresh courage and makes us strong again.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, June 6, 1944, Page 336

 

“Sometimes I’m so deeply buried under self-reproaches that I long for a word of comfort to help me dig myself out again.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, June 13, 1944, Page 341

 

“Women should be respected as well! Generally speaking, men are held in great esteem in all parts of the world, so why shouldn’t women have their share? Soldiers and war heroes are honored and commemorated, explorers are granted immortal fame, martyrs are revered, but how many people look upon women too as soldiers?…Women, who struggle and suffer pain to ensure the continuation of the human race, make much tougher and more courageous soldiers than all those big-mouthed freedom-fighting heroes put together!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, June 13, 1944, Page 344

 

“In the book Soldiers on the Home Front, I was greatly struck by the fact that in childbirth alone, women commonly suffer more pain, illness and misery than any war hero ever does. An what’s her reward for enduring all that pain? She gets pushed aside when she’s disfigured by birth, her children soon leave, hear beauty is gone. Women, who struggle and suffer pain to ensure the continuation of the human race, make much tougher and more courageous soldiers than all those big-mouthed freedom-fighting heroes put together.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, June 13, 1944, Page 344

 

“There’s only one rule you need to remember: laugh at everything and forget everybody else! It sounds egotistical, but it’s actually the only cure for those suffering from self-pity.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Friday, June 16, 1944, Page 345

 

“I can’t imagine how anyone can say: “I’m weak,” and then remain so. After all, if you know it, why not fight against it, why not try to train your character? The answer was: “Because it’s so much easier not to!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Thursday, July 6, 1944, Page 349

 

“We have many reasons to hope for great happiness, but. . . we have to earn it. And that’s something you can’t achieve by taking the easy way out. Earning happiness means doing good and working, not speculating and being lazy. Laziness may look inviting, but only work gives you true satisfaction.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Thursday, July 6, 1944, Page 350

 

“People who are religious should be glad, since not everyone is blessed with the ability to believe in a higher order. You don’t even have to live in fear of eternal punishment; the concepts of purgatory, heaven and hell are difficult for many people to accept, yet religion itself, any religion, keeps a person on the right path. Not the fear of God, but upholding your own sense of honor and obeying your own conscience. How noble and good everyone could be if, at the end of each day, they were to review their own behavior and weigh up the rights and wrongs. They would automatically try to do better at the start of each new day and, after a while, would certainly accomplish a great deal. Everyone is welcome to this prescription; it costs nothing and is definitely useful. Those who don’t know will have to find out by experience that “a quiet conscience gives you strength!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Thursday, July 6, 1944, Pages 350, 351

 

“A quiet conscience gives you strength!”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Thursday, July 6, 1944, Page 351

 

“I have one outstanding character trait that must be obvious to anyone who’s known me for any length of time: I have a great deal of self-knowledge. In everything I do, I can watch myself as if I were a stranger. I can stand c across from the everyday Anne and, without being biased or making excuses, watch what she’s doing, both the good and the bad. This self-awareness never leaves me, and every time I open my mouth, I think, “You should have said that differently” or “That’s fine the way it is.” I condemn myself in so many ways that I’m beginning to realize the truth of Father’s adage: “Every child has to raise itself.” Parents can only advise their children or point them in the right direction. Ultimately, people shape their own characters. In addition, I face life with an extraordinary amount of courage. I feel so strong and capable of bearing burdens, so young and free! When I first realized this, I was glad, because it means I can more easily withstand the blows life has in store.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, July 15, 1944, Pages 354, 355

 

“Deep down, the young are lonelier than the old.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, July 15, 1944, Page 358

 

“It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, July 15, 1944, Page 358

 

“In spite of everything I still believe that people are really good at heart. I simply can’t build up my hopes on a foundation consisting of confusion, misery, and death. I see the world gradually being turned into a wilderness, I hear the ever approaching thunder, which will destroy us too, I can feel the sufferings of millions and yet, if I look up into the heavens, I think that it will all come right, that this cruelty too will end, and that peace and tranquility will return again.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, July 15, 1944, Page 358

 

“It’s difficult in times like these: ideals, dreams and cherished hopes rise within us, only to be crushed by grim reality. It’s a wonder I haven’t abandoned all my ideals, they seem so absurd and impractical. Yet I cling to them because I still believe, in spite of everything, that people are truly good at heart.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Saturday, July 15, 1944, Page 358

 

“I get cross, then sad, and finally end up turning my heart inside out, and keep trying to find a way to become what I’d like to be and what I could be if….if only there were no other people in the world.”

~Anne Frank, The Diary of a Young Girl, Tuesday, August 1, 1944, Page 363

Further Reading

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Night Book Quotes With Page Numbers

The Best Book Quotes With Page Numbers

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