50 Animal Farm Quotes With Page Numbers

These Animal Farm quotes with page numbers help you find your favorite quotes.

Animal Farm, by George Orwell, is about farm animals that rebel against their human farmer. The animals want freedom and equality. But their revolution is betrayed by a pig named Napoleon. Napoleon and his pig friends abuse their power and the animals are no better off than before the rebellion.

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Animal Farm, by George Orwell, is about farm animals that rebel against their human farmer. The animals want freedom and equality. But their revolution is betrayed by a pig named Napoleon. Napoleon and his pig friends abuse their power and the animals are no better off than before the rebellion.” data-pin-id=”834221530993363161″>

Animal Farm Quotes With Page Numbers

“Clover was a stout motherly mare approaching middle life, who had never quite got her figure back after her fourth foal.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 4

 

“He would say that God had given him a tail to keep the flies off, but that he would sooner have had no tail and no flies.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 5

 

“Last of all came the cat, who looked round, as usual, for the warmest place, and finally squeezed herself in between Boxer and Clover; there she purred contentedly throughout Major’s speech without listening to a word of what he was saying.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 6

 

“Now, comrades, what is the nature of this life of ours? Let us face it: our lives are miserable, laborious, and short.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 6

 

“Let us face it: our lives are miserable, laborious, and short.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 6

 

“There, comrades, is the answer to all our problems. It is summed up in a single word– Man”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 7

 

“Man is the only real enemy we have. Remove Man from the scene, and the root cause of hunger and overwork is abolished forever.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 7

 

“Man is the only creature that consumes without producing”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 7, 8

 

“Man is the only creature that consumes without producing. He does not give milk, he does not lay eggs, he is too weak to pull the plough, he cannot run fast enough to catch rabbits. Yet he is lord of all the animals. He sets them to work, he gives back to them the bare minimum that will prevent them from starving, and the rest he keeps for himself.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 7, 8

 

“Never listen when they tell you that Man and the animals have a common interest, that the prosperity of the one is the prosperity of the others. It is all lies. Man serves the interest of no creature except himself.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 10

 

“Man serves the interests of no creature except himself.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 10

 

“All men are enemies. All animals are comrades”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 10

 

“Comrades,” he said, “here is a point that must be settled. The wild creatures, such as rats and rabbits–are they our friends or our enemies? Let us put it to the vote. I propose this question to the meeting: Are rats comrades?”

The vote was taken at once, and it was agreed by an overwhelming majority that rats were comrades. There were only four dissentients, the three dogs and the cat, who was afterwards discovered to have voted on both sides.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 10

 

“Weak or strong, clever or simple, we are all brothers.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 11

 

“All the habits of Man are evil.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 11

 

“Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy. Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 11

 

“And remember also that in fighting against man we must not come to resemble him. Even when you have conquered him, do not adopt his vices.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 11

 

“Beasts of England, beasts of Ireland,
Beasts of every land and clime,
Hearken to my joyful tidings
Of the golden future time.

Soon or late the day is coming,
Tyrant Man shall be o’erthrown,
And the fruitful fields of England
Shall be trod by beasts alone.

Rings shall vanish from our noses,
And the harness from our back,
Bit and spur shall rust forever,
Cruel whips shall no more crack.

Riches more than mind can picture,
Wheat and barley, oats and hay,
Clover, beans, and mangel-wurzels,
Shall be ours upon that day.

Bright will shine the fields of England,
Purer shall its water be,
Sweeter yet shall blow its breezes
On the day that sets us free.

For that day we all must labour,
Though we die before it break;
Cows and horses, geese and turkeys,
All must toils for freedom’s sake.

Beasts of England, beasts of Ireland,
Beasts of every land and clime,
Hearken well and spread my tidings
Of the golden future time. ”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 12, 13

 

“Can you not understand that liberty is worth more than just ribbons?”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 17

 

“Some hams hanging in the kitchen were taken out for burial”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 23

 

“The Seven Commandments:
Whatever goes upon two legs is an enemy.
Whatever goes upon four legs, or has wings, is a friend.
No animal shall wear clothes.
No animal shall sleep in a bed.
No animal shall drink alcohol.
No animal shall kill any other animal.
All animals are equal.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Chapter 2, Pages 24, 25

 

“His answer to every problem, every setback was “I will work harder!” —which he had adopted as his personal motto.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 29

 

“Donkeys live a long time. None of you has ever seen a dead donkey.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 30

 

“The cat joined the Re-education Committee and was very active in it for some days. She was seen one dag sitting on a roof and talking to some sparrows who were just out of her reach. She was telling them that all animals were now comrades and that any sparrow who chose could come and perch on her paw; but the sparrows kept their distance.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 32

 

“The distinguishing mark of man is the hand, the instrument with which he does all his mischief.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 34

 

“Four legs good, two legs bad.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 34, 47, 48, 55, 63, 88, and 116

 

“Comrades!’ he cried. ‘You do not imagine, I hope, that we pigs are doing this in a spirit of selfishness and privilege? Many of us actually dislike milk and apples. I dislike them myself. Our sole object in taking these things is to preserve our health. Milk and apples (this has been proved by Science, comrades) contain substances absolutely necessary to the well-being of a pig. We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organisation of this farm depend on us. Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink the milk and eat those apples.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 35, 36

 

“Day and night we are watching over your welfare. It is for YOUR sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples. Do you know what would happen if we pigs failed in our duty? Jones would come back! Yes, Jones would come back! Surely, comrades,” cried Squealer almost pleadingly”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 36

 

“The only good human being is a dead one.”

~George Orwell, Chapter 4, Animal Farm, Page 43

 

“I have no wish to take life, not even human life”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 43

 

“Windmill or no windmill, he said, life would go on as it had always gone on–that is, badly.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 51

 

“Several of them would have protested if they could have found the right arguments.”

~George Orwell, Chapter 5, Animal Farm, Page 54

 

“No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be?”

~George Orwell, Chapter 5, Animal Farm, Page 55

 

“I trust that every animal here appreciates the sacrifice that Comrade Napoleon has made in taking this extra labour upon himself. Do not imagine, comrades, that leadership is a pleasure! On the contrary, it is a deep and heavy responsibility. No one believes more firmly than Comrade Napoleon that all animals are equal. He would be only too happy to let you make your decisions for yourselves. But sometimes you might make the wrong decisions, comrades, and then where should we be?”

~George Orwell, Chapter 5, Animal Farm, Page 55

 

“Surely, comrades, you don’t want Jones back?”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 56

 

“This work was strictly voluntary, but any animal who absented himself from it would have his rations reduced by half.”

~George Orwell, Chapter 5, Animal Farm, Page 59

 

“I do not understand it. I would not have believed that such things could happen on our farm. It must be due to some fault in ourselves. The solution, as I see it, is to work harder. From now onwards I shall get up a full hour earlier in the mornings.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 85

 

“As Clover looked down the hillside her eyes filled with tears. If she could have spoken her thoughts, it would have been to say that this was not what they had aimed at when they had set themselves years ago to work for the overthrow of the human race. These scenes of terror and slaughter were not what they had looked forward to on that night when old Major first stirred them to rebellion. If she herself had had any picture of the future, it had been of a society of animals set free from hunger and the whip, all equal, each working according to his capacity, the strong protecting the weak, as she had protected the lost brood of ducklings with her foreleg on the night of Major’s speech. Instead–she did not know why–they had come to a time when no one dared speak his mind, when fierce, growling dogs roamed everywhere, and when you had to watch your comrades torn to pieces after confessing to shocking crimes. There was no thought of rebellion or disobedience in her mind. She knew that, even as things were, they were far better off than they had been in the days of Jones, and that before all else it was needful to prevent the return of the human beings. Whatever happened she would remain faithful, work hard, carry out the orders that were given to her, and accept the leadership of Napoleon. But still, it was not for this that she and all the other animals had hoped and toiled.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 86, 87

 

“they had come to a time when no one dared speak his mind, when fierce, growling dogs roamed everywhere, and when you had to watch your comrades torn to pieces after confessing to shocking crimes.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 87

 

“Such were her thoughts, though she lacked the words to express them.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 87

 

“It had become usual to give Napoleon the Credit for every Successful achievement and every stroke of good fortune. You would often hear one hen remark to another, “Under the guidance of our leader, Comrade Napoleon, I have laid five eggs in six days” or two cows, enjoying a drink at the pool, would exclaim,
“thanks to the leadership of Comrade Napoleon, how excellent this water tastes!”…”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 93

 

“Friend of fatherless!
Fountain of happiness!
Lord of the swill-bucket! Oh, how my soul is on
Fire when I gaze at thy
Calm and commanding eye.
Like the sun in the sky,
Comrade Napoleon!

Thou are the giver of
All thy creatures love,
Full belly twice a day, clean straw to roll upon;
Every beast great or small,
Sleeps at peace in his stall,
Thou watchest over all,
Comrade Napoleon!

Had I a sucking-pig,
Ere he had grown as big
Even as a pint bottle or a a rolling-pin
He should have learned to be
Faithful and true to thee,
Yes, his first squeak should be
Comrade Napoleon!”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 94, 95

 

“Up there, comrades,” he would say solemnly, pointing to the sky with his large beak– “up there, just on the other side of that dark cloud that you can see– there it lies, Sugarcandy Mountain, that happy country where we poor animals shall rest for ever from our labours!” He even claimed to have been there on one of his higher flights, and to have seen the everlasting fields of clover and the linseed cake and lump sugar growing on the hedges. Many of the animals believed him. Their lives now, they reasoned, were hungry and laborious; was it not right and just that a better world should exist somewhere else?”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 117, 118

 

“Somehow it seemed as though the farm had grown richer without making the animals themselves any richer—except, of course, for the pigs and the dogs.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 129

 

“Only old Benjamin professed to remember every detail of his long life and to know that things never had been, nor ever could be much better or much worse–hunger, hardship, and disappointment being, so he said, the unalterable law of life.”

~George Orwell, Chapter 10, Animal Farm, Page 130

 

“And yet the animals never gave up hope. More, they never lost, even for an instant, their sense of honour and privilege in being members of Animal Farm. They were still the only farm in the whole county-in all England!-owned and operated by animals. Not one of them, not even the youngest, not even the newcomers who had been brought from farms ten or twenty miles away, ever ceased to marvel at that. And when they heard the gun booming and saw the green flag fluttering at the masthead, their hearts swelled with imperishable pride, and the talk turned always towards the old heroic days, the expulsion of Jones, the writing of the Seven Commandments, the great battles in which the human invaders had been defeated. None of the old dreams had been abandoned. The Republic of the Animals which Major had foretold, when the green fields of England should be untrodden by human feet, was still believed in. Some day it was coming: it might not be soon, it might not be with in the lifetime of any animal now living, but still it was coming. Even the tune of Beasts of England was perhaps hummed secretly here and there: at any rate, it was a fact that every animal on the farm knew it, though no one would have dared to sing it aloud. It might be that their lives were hard and that not all of their hopes had been fulfilled; but they were conscious that they were not as other animals. If they went hungry, it was not from feeding tyrannical human beings; if they worked hard, at least they worked for themselves. No creature among them went upon two legs. No creature called any other creature “Master.” All animals were equal.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Pages 131, 132

 

“…out from the door of the farmhouse came a long file of pigs, all walking on their hind legs…out came Napoleon himself, majestically upright, casting haughty glances from side to side, and with his dogs gambolling round him.

He carried a whip in his trotter.

There was a deadly silence. Amazed, terrified, huddling together, the animals watched the long line of pigs march slowly round the yard. It was as though the world had turned upside-down. Then there came a moment when the first shock had worn off and when, in spite of everything-in spite of their terror of the dogs, and of the habit, developed through long years, of never complaining, never criticising, no matter what happened-they might have uttered some word of protest. But just at that moment, as though at a signal, all the sheep burst out into a tremendous bleating of-

“Four legs good, two legs better! Four legs good, two legs better! Four legs good, two legs better!”

It went on for five minutes without stopping. And by the time the sheep had quieted down, the chance to utter any protest had passed, for the pigs had marched back into the farmhouse.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 133

 

“Four legs good, two legs better! All Animals Are Equal. But Some Animals Are More Equal Than Others.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Chapter 10, Page 134

 

“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Chapter 10, Page 134

 

“Between pigs and human beings there was not and there need not be any clash of interest whatsoever.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Page 138

 

“Twelve voices were shouting in anger, and they were all alike. No question, now, what had happened to the faces of the pigs. The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Chapter 10, Page 141

 

“The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.”

~George Orwell, Animal Farm, Chapter 10, Page 141

 

Animal Farm Animated Summary

 

 

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