16 Personalities: A Complete Guide to Myers-Briggs and personality Types

Want a deeper understanding of the 16 personalities?

If you’ve ever taken a personality test, chances are you’re familiar with the 16 personality types. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is one of the most popular personality tests in the world, and it sorts people into 16 different categories.

So what do these 16 personality types mean? And how can they help you better understand yourself and others?

In this complete guide to Myers-Briggs and the 16 personalities, we’ll answer all these questions and more. We’ll start with a brief overview of the Myers-Briggs system, then dive into each of the 16 personality types in detail. Let’s get started!

Table of Contents

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What is personality type?

Personality typing is classifying people according to their tendency to think and act in particular ways.

This process attempts to find the broadest, most important ways in which people differ, such as their temperament, values, interests, motivations, and behaviors.

Personality types can be used to understand oneself better by identifying one’s unique traits and how they relate to others, as well as for career guidance or personal growth purposes—for example, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®). 

 

The 16 personality types based on Myers-Briggs

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) uses 16 different personality types that are determined based on four main criteria: extroversion (E) vs. introversion (I), sensing (S) vs. intuition (N), thinking (T) vs. feeling (F), and judging (J) vs. perceiving(P).

 

1. INTJ: “Introverted, iNtuitive, Thinking, and Judging.”

INTJs are known as “The Architect” personality type in the 16 personalities model. They are introverted, intuitive, thinking, and judging individuals who are often described as being private, reserved, and analytical.

INTJs make up only 2% of the population and are often seen as gifted in their intellect and creativity. They are often drawn to careers in science, engineering, or architecture.
INTJs often have a strong intuition and can see patterns others may miss.

This allows them to be quick thinkers and problem-solvers. They are often able to find creative solutions to difficult problems.

INTJs are also known for their independent thinking and ability to think outside the box. They often have strong convictions and are not afraid to stand up for their beliefs.

2. INTP: “Introverted, Intuitive, Thinking, and Perceiving.”

People with the INTP personality type are often described as introverted, intuitive, thinking, and perceiving.

They are often very creative and enjoy finding new ways to look at things. They are also known for their independent thinking and desire to find the truth. They often enjoy spending time alone or with a small group of close friends.

They are usually not interested in large groups or social events. They prefer to spend their time thinking about ideas and problems.

3. ENTJ: “Extraverted, iNtuitive, Thinking, and Judging.”

ENTJs are characterized by extroversion, intuition, thinking, and judging preferences. They are outgoing individuals who enjoy interacting with others and making decisions based on logic and reasoning.

They tend to be task or goal-oriented individuals who are good at strategizing and planning to achieve success.

4. ENTP: “Extraverted, iNtuitive, Thinking, and Perceiving.”

The ENTP personality type is one of the sixteen types identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). It combines extraversion, intuition, thinking, and perceiving preferences.

ENTPs are outgoing, creative individuals who enjoy debating ideas and love to explore new possibilities. They are curious observers who thrive on challenging conventional wisdom and discovering new solutions.

Characteristics of the ENTP personality type include enthusiasm for life; excitement for new ideas; the desire to understand how things work; a keen eye for detail; the ability to see multiple sides of an issue; quick wit; charm and humor; willingness to take risks in pursuit of success.

5. INFJ: “Introverted, iNtuitive, Feeling, and Judging.”

The INFJ personality type combines introversion, intuition, feeling, and judging (or perceiving). INFJs are known for their complex inner world of ideas and values.

They can be visionary leaders who can inspire others through their natural empathy and compassion for humanity. They tend to be idealists who seek meaning in all things yet can also be pragmatic when necessary.

Characteristics of the INFJ personality type include strong interpersonal skills; keen insight into others’ motives; ability to understand complex issues quickly; excellent verbal communication skills; creativity in solving problems or creating new ideas; desire for harmony in personal relationships; desire for social change or improvement in the world.

INFJ Personality Type: What’s The INFJs True Personality Meaning?

6. INFP: “Introverted, iNtuitive, Feeling, and Perceiving.”

The INFP personality type is known for its altruistic nature, compassion for others, and desire to improve the world. They are dreamers who seek meaning and value in everything they do. INFPs are creative, imaginative individuals who enjoy exploring new ideas and concepts.

They value integrity and honesty in all their interactions with others and are willing to go above and beyond to help those in need. Furthermore, INFPs have an intense curiosity that drives them to explore new experiences.

INFP Personality Type: The Mediator (Perceiving, Intuitive, Feeling, Intuitive)

7. ENFJ: “Extraverted, iNtuitive, Feeling, and Judging.”

The ENFJ personality type is one of the 16 types identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). It represents those who prefer extraversion, intuition, feeling, and judging.

ENFJs are warmly expressive people who seek to understand others and help them find their paths in life. They enjoy being in charge of projects and initiatives and motivating others to work together toward common goals.

The characteristics of an ENFJ personality type include warmth, empathy, compassion for others; good communication skills; optimism and hope for the future; leadership abilities; adept at motivating others to work together towards a common goal; ability to understand complex issues quickly and offer solutions that are both practical yet idealistic.

8. ENFP: “Extraverted, iNtuitive, Feeling, and Perceiving.”

The ENFP personality type combines Extraversion, Intuition, Feeling, and Perception. ENFPs are creative and enthusiastic individuals who enjoy exploring new possibilities and developing innovative solutions to problems.

They thrive in the company of people and enjoy meaningful conversations about ideas or concepts they care deeply about.

The ENFP personality type is characterized by optimism, creativity, insightfulness, enthusiasm for life, desire for personal growth, and the ability to connect with others easily.

ENFP Personality Type Meaning: How Is Your Character Unique?

9. ISTJ: “Introverted, Sensing, Thinking, and Judging.”

ISTJs are characterized by their preference for Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, and Judgement. They are detail-oriented individuals who plan and organize their lives according to logical principles.

They value efficiency, loyalty, and tradition and can be relied on to follow through with tasks they commit to completing.

The ISTJ personality type is important because it represents one of the world’s most common personality types. Approximately 13% of people have an ISTJ personality, making them valuable contributors in many fields, such as business leadership, education policymaking, and social services administration.

Furthermore, studies show that people with an ISTJ personality tend to live longer than others due to their cautious nature, which leads them to avoid risky behaviors such as smoking or drinking excessively.

10. ISFJ: “Introverted, Sensing, Feeling, and Judging.”

The ISFJ personality type combines Introversion, Sensing, Feeling, and Judging preferences. It is characterized by an outwardly caring and considerate nature and a desire to maintain order in its environment.

The ISFJ type is often found in careers such as healthcare providers or teachers due to their ability to connect with others quickly and facilitate positive relationships.

The ISFJ personality type is essential because it can provide valuable insight into the needs of those around us. Those with this type of personality tend to value harmony in relationships above all else, so they can serve as good mediators when conflicts arise.

Additionally, they are detail-oriented individuals capable of seeing both sides of an issue due to their empathetic nature, making them ideal problem solvers when finding solutions that benefit everyone involved.

11. ESTJ: “Extraverted, Sensing, Thinking, and Judging.”

The ESTJ personality type is one of the 16 types identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). ESTJs are extroverted, sensing, thinking, and judging individuals who prefer to make decisions based on facts rather than emotion.

They are known for being practical, organized, and responsible individuals who take their responsibilities seriously and strive to get things done efficiently.

The ESTJ personality type is important because it can provide valuable insight into how people interact with each other and how they approach different situations in life.

Understanding someone’s personality type can help us better understand how they think, what motivates them, and what makes them happy or upset – all of which can be useful when developing relationships with others or working together on a project.

12. ESFJ: “Extraverted, Sensing, Feeling, and Judging.”

The ESFJ personality type is one of the sixteen types identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). ESFJs are extroverted, feeling and judging individuals seeking support, guidance, and harmony in their relationships.

They are driven by a desire to make people happy and take pride in their ability to help others. They value loyalty, honesty, and kindness in their interactions with others.

The ESFJ personality type is important because it can provide valuable insight into how people interact with each other in social settings.

Understanding someone’s personality type can help individuals better understand why someone may act in certain ways or have particular preferences or values.

Additionally, knowledge of different personality types can be beneficial when working on team projects as it helps bring together people with different viewpoints who may otherwise not have worked together successfully – allowing for more creative solutions that draw from multiple perspectives.

13. ISTP: “Introverted, Sensing, Thinking, and Perceiving.”

The ISTP personality type prefers introversion, intuition, sensing, and thinking. They are pragmatic problem solvers who base their decisions on logic and objective evidence.

They are observant individuals who are good at noticing details and understanding how things work.

The ISTP personality type is necessary because these individuals can offer insight into complex situations or systems. Their ability to see the big picture while still paying attention to detail makes them effective decision-makers in various fields, such as technology, science, engineering, and business management.

Additionally, ISTPs have an innate ability to understand how people think, which makes them great at communicating with others in a practical yet concise way.

14. ISFP: “Introverted, Sensing, Feeling, and Perceiving.”

ISFPs are introspective, sensitive souls who enjoy spending time alone in nature. They are in tune with their feelings and emotions, and they’re very compassionate toward others.

ISFPs are often drawn to creative pursuits and strongly appreciate art and beauty. They’re gentle people who prefer to live in harmony with others. 

15. ESTP: “Extraverted, Sensing, Thinking, and Perceiving.”

The ESTP personality type is classified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as an extraverted, sensing, thinking, and perceiving type.

This means that individuals with this type tend to be outgoing, practical, and adaptable. They can make decisions quickly based on their experience or situation observations.

The ESTP personality type is important because it represents one of the largest groups of personalities in the population today.

People with this type are often successful entrepreneurs because they have strong interpersonal skills, can quickly adapt to changing environments, and have an innate ability to spot opportunities for success.

16. ESFP: “Extraverted, Sensing, Feeling, and Perceiving.”

The Extroversion personality type is outgoing, energetic, and enthusiastic. They enjoy being around others and are usually very sociable. They are generally optimistic and have a positive outlook on life.

The Sensing personality type is practical, pragmatic, and detail-oriented. They value facts over theories and base their decisions on concrete evidence rather than hunches or assumptions.

The Feeling personality type is compassionate, empathetic, and understanding of other people’s emotions and motivations. They tend to make decisions based on personal values rather than logic or reasonability.

Finally, the Judging personality type prefers orderliness in their life; they like plans to be laid out clearly with little room for ambiguity or confusion in their day-to-day activities.

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Try the free 16 Personalities Quiz at 16 personalities.com.

 

What are the different types of personality tests?

1. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI)

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a popular personality test that classifies individuals into one of 16 different personality types based on their preferences in four categories: extroversion vs. introversion, sensing vs. intuition, thinking vs. feeling, and judging vs. perceiving.

It was developed by Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers in the 1940s. It has been widely used since then due to its purported ability to help people better understand themselves and their relationships with others.

The MBTI has been widely popularized over the past several decades due to its simplicity, reliability, validity, and widespread use worldwide.

Many people find it helpful to understand their personalities better and those of others; this can be useful when making important life decisions such as choosing a career path or finding compatible relationships or friends.

Additionally, some research suggests that using the MBTI can help individuals learn how to maximize their strengths while minimizing their weaknesses—therefore improving overall well-being—which adds further credibility to its use as a valid psychological tool for self-understanding purposes.

 

2. The Big Five Personality Test

The Big Five Personality Test is a model that assigns a person to one of 16 personality types based on five main dimensions: openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism.

It’s considered one of the most widely used psychological models for describing human personality.

Its characteristics include: providing a detailed description of how someone is and why they do things their way; thematizing the experience and thinking within each type; being highly theoretical; assigning people to one specific type with rigid results that can hardly be adapted to individual situations; taking into account neuroticism as an unhealthy dimension distinct from other models such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) or Enneagram.

 

3. The Enneagram Test

The Enneagram Test is a popular personality test that categorizes people into nine different types based on their underlying motivations, desires, and fears. It was developed in the early 1900s by psychoanalyst Oscar Ichazo and later expanded upon by philosopher Gurdjieff.

The test aims to understand how people think, feel and act based on their personality type. It focuses on identifying patterns of behavior that can be used to understand oneself and others better.

The Enneagram Test has become increasingly popular over the years due to its comprehensive insights into human psychology and ability to help individuals better understand themselves.

Furthermore, it provides an alternative approach compared to other popular tests such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) or Big Five Personality Model, which only focus on one aspect of personality without considering unhealthy traits such as neuroticism or negative emotions like anger or resentment.

 

4. The Clifton StrengthFinder Test

The Clifton StrengthFinder Test is a free personality test based on Carl Jung’s and Isabel Briggs Myers’ typological approach to personality.

It provides users with their 4-letter type formula, information about their preferences’ strengths, and a description of their personality type, communication, and learning style.

The Clifton StrengthFinder Test is unique because it gives users valuable insights into their personalities while providing guidance on which careers may be most suitable for them based on their type.

Additionally, it allows users to compare themselves to famous personalities of the same type to gain an even deeper understanding of who they are as individuals. Lastly, this test can be used with its partner test – the Jung Marriage Test – to assess long-term compatibility between partners whose personalities may differ.

 

5. The Keirsey Temperament Sorter

The Keirsey Temperament Sorter is another famous personality test that classifies people based on their dominant temperament or how they respond to new experiences and situations.

The Keirsey Temperament Sorter includes the following 16 types: Idealist (NF), Rationalist (NT), Artisan (SP), Guardian (SJ), Promoter (EP), and Enterprising Adventurous (EAP). Each type has unique characteristics that determine how individuals interact with the world around them.

For example, Idealists are imaginative, compassionate, creative individuals who seek harmony between self and others, while Rationalists are logical thinkers who enjoy exploring ideas and solving problems with logic alone.

 

6. The Koulantzis Typology Evaluation (KTE)

The Koulantzis Typology Evaluation (KTE) is a personality test based on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). It was developed by Greek psychiatrist Ioannis Koulantzis in the 1980s and has been used worldwide since then.

The KTE aims to identify a person’s strengths, weaknesses, motivations, values, preferences, and career interests by assessing their personality type based on 16 different categories.

The KTE is considered unique due to its personalized nature. It provides individuals with insights into their strengths and passions to better understand themselves and find a suitable career path.

Additionally, it helps students identify university courses that align with their interests, making choosing the right academic course easier.

 

7. The Socionics Test

The Socionics Test is a free online personality test based on the typological approach developed by Lithuanian researcher Aušra Augustinavičiūtė.

It provides users with a 4-letter type formula that identifies their dominant personality traits, communication style, and learning preferences.

The Socionics Test differs from other personality tests because it focuses on understanding how people interact with each other rather than just describing an individual’s characteristics.

Additionally, it considers an individual’s preferences and strengths in each area, making it more comprehensive than other personality tests, such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or the Carl Jung Typology Assessment Questionnaire.

 

8. The Relationship Institute Type Indicator (RITI)

The Relationship Institute Type Indicator (RITI) is a personality test developed by Dr. Paul Tieger and Dr. Barbara Barron-Tieger in 1999. It is based on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®) but focuses specifically on understanding relationships between people rather than individual personalities.

The RITI categorizes people into four relationship types: Expressives, Guardians, Analytics, or Sentinels. Each type has its strengths and weaknesses that can be used to understand better how relationships work in both personal and professional settings.

The RITI differs from other popular personality tests, such as the MBTI®, because it focuses on relationships rather than individual personalities.

Additionally, it provides more detailed insight into each relationship type by outlining their specific strengths and weaknesses compared to other types within the same category (e.g., expressive vs. analytical).

This allows individuals to make smarter decisions about their relationships based on understanding how each type operates differently in different situations or environments.

 

9. The Carl Jung Typology Test

The Carl Jung Typology Test is a free online personality assessment based on the typological approach developed by Carl Jung and Isabel Briggs Myers. It provides users with their 4-letter type formula, strengths of preferences, personality type description, communication, and learning style.

The Carl Jung Typology Test is popular because it provides valuable insight into one’s personality traits, allowing individuals to understand themselves better and how they interact with others. It also helps identify careers and educational institutions most suitable for each individual’s unique personality.

Additionally, it allows users to compare their results with those of famous personalities who share their type – an interesting feature that adds an extra layer of insight into one’s character traits.

 

10. The Personality Headsets Test

The Personality Headsets Test is a psychometric test that uses the latest advances in research to identify a person’s personality type.

It combines time-tested concepts with robust and highly accurate testing techniques to accurately describe who someone is and why they do things the way they do.

The test takes about 10 minutes and includes questions about your lifestyle, preferences, habits, values, goals, and ambitions.

The results are based on upbringing, genetics, and life experiences. After taking the test, users receive an in-depth description of their personality type and tips on improving relationships with others of different types.

 

How to interpret your personality type results?

Step 1: Figure out which personality type is right for you

  1. Take the free personality test based on Carl Jung’s and Isabel Briggs Myers’ typological approach to personality.
  2. Upon completing the questionnaire, you will receive your 4-letter type formula (e.g., ESFJ), along with the strengths of your preferences and a description of your personality type, communication, and learning style.
  3. Use this information to understand yourself and those around you better and gain insight into which careers or occupations may be best suited for you based on your type’s strengths preference list (e.g., ESFJs often thrive in careers that involve helping others).
  4. Identify famous personalities who share your type (e..g., Oprah Winfrey) to get an even better sense of what it means to be an ESFJ in today’s world.

 

Step 2: Know what life experiences are typical for your personality type

People of my personality type tend to have the following life experiences:

  • They are usually very driven and ambitious, with a strong desire to succeed.
  • They can be perfectionists who strive for excellence in everything they do.
  • They are excellent problem solvers who can analyze challenging situations quickly and develop logical solutions.
  • They tend to be independent, self-motivated individuals who don’t need much supervision or guidance.
  • They may have difficulty interacting socially due to their introverted nature; however, they can still form close relationships with those they trust deeply.

 

Step 3: Identify the traits that are most common in your personality type

People with the same personality type tend to share certain traits. For example, according to Isabel Myers and Katharine Briggs’ typology, people with an ESTP personality type are outgoing, practical problem-solvers who enjoy taking on new challenges.

People with an INFJ personality type are deeply caring individuals who are often seen as idealistic dreamers due to their strong sense of values and desire for harmony in all interactions.

Understanding your personality type can help you better understand your motivations, behaviors, strengths, weaknesses, and preferences in relationships and careers that suit you best. It can also help you identify common traits shared among people of the same type, which may provide insight into how they interact.

Additionally, it helps recognize which careers may suit those of similar types or if there are any potential compatibility issues regarding long-term romantic partnerships between two people of different types.

 

Step 4: Learn how to interact with people of your personality type

  1. Understand the differences between personality types. Take time to familiarize yourself with the 16 personality types outlined by the MBTI test. The Humanmetrics Blog offers an in-depth breakdown of each type and its characteristics. 
  2. Practice communication strategies for each type. Once you have identified your personality type, learn how to best communicate with others who fall into that category by reading up on communication strategies for each type or taking a Myers-Briggs test online.
  3. Learn about learning styles. Understanding how different people learn best will help you tailor your teaching methods and improve your communication skills when interacting with others of varying personality types.

 

Step 5: Learn about the different cultures and religions associated with your personality type.

The different cultures and religions associated with your personality type results include:

  • Western Culture: The four-letter type formula generated from the Jungian-Myersian approach is based on Western culture. This means that people with a specific type may have certain cultural influences that shape their behaviors, attitudes, and values. For example, an ISTJ might be more likely to hold traditional values associated with Christianity or Judaism than someone who belongs to another type.
  • Eastern Culture: In contrast, Eastern cultures such as Hinduism or Buddhism may recognize multiple personality types rather than just one dominant one. Eastern philosophies also view individuals as unique in terms of their strengths and weaknesses rather than comparing them against a standard as Western societies do.

 

Step 6: Make use of online resources tailored to your personality.

  1. Fill up the form: The first step is to fill up a form online, which will provide you access to an MBTI personality type test.
  2. Receive the link for the test via email: Once you have completed filling out the form, you will receive an email with a link that allows you to take the test.
  3. Click on the link to take up the test: This link will lead you to the website where you can take up your 16 personalities test to get your results later on down the line.
  4. Take up test and answer questionnaire: Once on this website, make sure that you take time out of your day or schedule some free time for you to complete all 16 questions of this personality-type questionnaire before submitting it back through their system for analysis purposes later on down the line when needed be!

 

Step 7: Discover the best ways for you to express yourself

  1. Take the personality type test to find out your personality type.
  2. Read through the descriptions of each personality type to understand how they differ and what traits they include.
  3. Learn about each type’s unique challenges to better understand how to express yourself to achieve happiness and success in life!

 

Step 8: Personal growth is an important part of being an INFJ

Personal growth is important for INFJs because it allows them to become more self-aware and aware of their impact on others. It also helps them to develop their creative talents and use them to help others.

By understanding their strengths and those of others, INFJs can better assign tasks in group settings and achieve their goals more efficiently.

Personal growth can also lead to a stronger sense of personal integrity, which is important for INFJs since they value honesty, authenticity, and trustworthiness in all relationships.

 

FAQ

What is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Test?

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a personality test developed in the 1940s based on the theories of Carl Jung. It claims to be able to group all people into 16 different “types” based on 93 questions that measure four distinct traits: extroversion vs. introversion, sensing vs. intuition, thinking vs. feeling, and judging vs. perceiving.

The test is widely used by corporate HR departments, colleges, and even government agencies worldwide due to its popularity and purported ability to provide insight into people’s personalities and potential career choices.

However, there is no evidence behind it, and it has been thoroughly disregarded by modern psychology since it was developed decades ago due to its lack of validity or predictive power for happiness or success in various jobs or relationships.

Additionally, several analyses have shown that about half of people who take the test twice get different results each time, indicating how meaningless these labels are. Therefore no organization in the 21st century should rely on this test for anything.

 

What are the 16 Personality Types?

A list of the 16 personality types:

  1. INTJ: The Advocate
  2. INTP: The Thinker
  3. ENTJ: The Commander
  4. ENTP: The Debater
  5. INFJ: The Advocate
  6. INFP: The Mediator
  7. ENFJ: The Protagonist
  8. ENFP: The Campaigner
  9. ISTJ: The Logistician
  10. ISFJ: The Defender
  11. ESTJ: The Executive
  12. ESFJ: The Consul
  13. ISTP: The Virtuoso
  14. ISFP: The Adventurer
  15. ESTP: The Entrepreneur
  16. ESFP: The Entertainer

The 16 Personality Types are a classification system that divides people into four groups: Analysts, Diplomats, Sentinels, and Explorers. Each type falls into one of these groups and is characterized by certain traits and behaviors.

 

How do I take the Myers-Briggs Personality Test?

  1. Fill up the form: To begin, you will need to fill up a form with your name, email address, and other details.

  2. Receive the link for the test via email: Once you have filled up the form, you will receive an email that will take you to the Myers-Briggs Personality Test website.

  3. Click on the link to take the test: This link will open up in a new tab or window, depending on your browser settings.

4 Take up test and answer questionnaire: Once opened, begin taking the 16 personalities test by answering questions related to your personality type preferences using either “True” or “False” answers.

5 After completing the test, receive results via email: Once finished, the results will be sent through email along with detailed explanations about each answer choice.

 

What are the strengths of the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator?

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is a popular personality test that claims to group all people into 16 different “types.” It is used by corporate HR departments, colleges, and government agencies worldwide.

The company producing and markets the test makes around $20 million yearly. Despite its popularity, there are several weaknesses associated with this test.

First, there is no evidence to support the validity of the test’s claims regarding how well it can predict people’s success in various jobs.

Second, several analyses have shown that it is ineffective at predicting people’s success in various jobs. That about half of those who take it twice get different results each time.

Finally, Carl Jung, whose theories formed the basis for this test, has warned against using his “types” as strict classifications since they are just rough tendencies he observed rather than defined categories.

 

How does the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator help me in my career?

The Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator is a scientifically-based test that uses 93 questions to identify an individual’s personality type and common behaviors.

By understanding yourself better, you can make a career choice that fits your personality. The test has been used by corporations, colleges, and government agencies since the 1940s.

It claims it can group all people into 16 different types and serve as “a powerful framework for building better relationships, driving positive change, harnessing innovation and achieving excellence.” Therefore it can be beneficial in helping you find a career that suits your personality type.

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How do I interpret my results from the Myers-Briggs Personality Test?

  1. After completing the personality assessment questionnaire, you will receive your 4-letter type formula (e.g., ESFJ). This indicates which of the 16 types you belong to, based on Carl Jung’s and Isabel Briggs Myers’ typology.
  2. The test will also describe your personality type and provide information about your strengths, preferences, and communication/learning style. This idea helps you better understand yourself and how you interact with others in different situations or environments.
  3. Use this information to explore careers or occupations that are most suitable for your type and educational institutions that offer relevant degrees or training programs related to it (e .g., if you are an ESTJ type, then look for careers in business management).
  4. Additionally, use these test results alongside the Jung Marriage Test™ to assess long-term compatibility with romantic partners with similar personality types (e .g., if both partners are ESFJs, then they will likely have good compatibility over time since they share similar values/beliefs/etc.).

 

What are the features of the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator?

The Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator has a core theory that explains how behavioral traits differ from person to person in different situations, resulting in various personality types.

The test assumes that the world’s population comprises 16 different types of people, divided into pairs of opposed personality functions.

It also includes a questionnaire that helps identify which type best describes an individual’s personality type and preferences regarding various aspects of life, such as how they take in information, make decisions and interact with others.

Additionally, it provides insights into how individuals can use their strengths to their advantage while improving on their weaknesses.

 

What are the potential issues with the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator?

The Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator has several potential issues, including:

  • It is based on outdated theories disregarded by the psychology community.
  • There is no evidence to support its claims of being able to predict people’s success in various jobs or their happiness in relationships or marriages.
  • The test results are often inconsistent when taken twice by the same person.

 

How does the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator compare to other personality tests?

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator is probably the most widely used personality test in the world, with about 2 million people taking it annually. It also has a reputation as being a reliable tool for determining someone’s career path or ideal relationship partner.

In contrast, other personality tests, such as the Five Factor Model, are based on scientific research and have proven to predict people’s success in various jobs. Additionally, these tests do not group all people into 16 discrete “types,” but rather use numerical scales to measure different traits that can be combined in different ways depending on the person.

 

What is the reliability of the Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator?

The Myers-Briggs Personality Type Indicator has been found to meet accepted standards of reliability and validity. Studies have found between 40% and 75% of respondents receive a different result after completing the inventory a second time, which suggests that it is not as reliable as claimed.

Additionally, in 1992 The Committee on Techniques for the Enhancement of Human Performance and the National Research Council suggested that “there is not sufficient well-designed research to justify the use of MBTI in career counseling programs.”

Furthermore, many other studies have also concluded that there is insufficient evidence to support its use in career counseling programs due to inadequate methodologies used in research studies.

 

How do I know which personality type I am?

There are a few different ways to find out your personality type. One way is to take a Myers-Briggs personality test. This test will ask you questions about how you prefer to live your life and make decisions.

Based on your answers, the test will give you a four-letter code corresponding to one of the 16 personality types.

Another way to determine your personality type is to look at the different characteristics of each type and see which ones resonate with you. For example, if you are very independent and like to have a lot of alone time, you might be an INTJ personality type.

 

Sources Cited 

  1. https://16personalities.com/articles/our-theory/
  2. https://www.talkspace.com/blog/16-personalities-what-are/
  3. https://greator.com/en/16-personalities/
  4. https://www.humanmetrics.com/personality
  5. https://www.truity.com/page/16-personality-types-myers-briggs
  6. https://www.verywellmind.com/the-myers-briggs-type-indicator-2795583
  7. https://myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/
  8. https://themyersbriggs.com/what-is-the-myers-briggs-type-indicator/
  9. https://www.vox.com/2014/7/15/5881947/myers-briggs-personality-test-meaningless
  10. https://professionalleadershipinstitute.com/personality/16-personalities/
  11. https://www.crystalknows.com/personalities/blog/16personalities
  12. https://www.bsu.edu/about/administrativeoffices/careercenter/tools-resources/personality-types

Conclusion

We hope this guide has helped you better understand the 16 Personality Types. If you’re interested in learning more about your personality type, we recommend taking the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator test. This test will give you a more in-depth look at your personality type and help you understand how you interact with the world around you.

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